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Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Latest News Blog

Transfer station work is progressing

Category: In The News - The Sparta Independent
Posted by Ralph DeFazio, Sales Manager on 07/01 at 10:33 PM

Sparta - Jason Cofrancesco, president of Grinnell Recycling, says he is delighted that work has now begun on the new 25,000-square-foot transfer station where the company will sort and sell a wide range of construction debris from demolished buildings. The new facility will be the county’s first solid waste transfer station/material recovery facility (MRF).

Sparta Township approved the construction permits on Jan. 23 on the same site as the company’s Class B facility, where the company takes in source-separated materials such as wood, cement and asphalt. The material is known as “source-separated” because it is separated before being brought to the facility.

The plans for the transfer station have been 10 years in the making, and the environmental permitting process cost Grinnell roughly $2 million.

“This facility took us 10 years to get permitted because the DEP has such stringent environmental regulations and oversight on facilities of this kind. They did their job, “ Cofrancesco said. “There is a substantial investment of time and money involved in getting a facility like this up and running. The facility has been approved for inclusion in the Sussex County Solid Waste Management Plan.”

“But Sparta did let us have our say and we weren’t shy about speaking out.”

The pre-cast concrete building will cost an estimated of $5 million to build, and will include a state-of-the-art scale and scale house, where the debris will be weighed.

The facilities will take eight to ten people to run, including machine operators, manual laborers, a weigh master and a floor manager.

Construction should be complete in early July of this year, and Grinnell expect to begin receiving the debris in early August.

Precision weighing is an important part of the work: The company is authorized to take in 400,000 tons of material each day and they are bound by law to keep a precise account.

“We’ll have machines that will be sorting the big pile of material dumped on the concrete floor,” Cofrancesco explained.

“Separating the material is the challenge. We’ll take the clean wood, and all the treated wood; pull out all the metal, glass, sheet rock cardboard, concrete, asphalt, rocks, stones - everything, We’ll separate it all and put it into piles. “

The material will leave the plant by truck. There is a train rail that runs along the border of the property, but the material won’t be shipped via rail.

“That’s how you redeem the recyclable value after you separate it. We’ll find end users to use Sheetrock. We can send all the glass to a glass recycler; all the metal to a metal person. We can send all the cardboard out to recycle.”

“There are certain products we can use. The clean wood for example. We can grind that and make mulch out of it. Then we can resell the mulch.”

“Profit is what the goal is. I don’t know the exact numbers, but we’re allowed to take in 400 tons of waste a day. So if one day we get 100 tons of crushed concrete, we can sell that for $100 a ton. So the math varies according to the waste we bring in. We haven’t solidified the markets yet. I don’t know what people are paying for glass.”

Danielle Naisby, whose husband, John, is president of the nearby Lake Grinnell Association, said that despite the state environmental approvals, she still feels anxious about the transfer station.

“I just hope that Grinnell complies faithfully with all the environmental regulations. We’re still worried about noise from truck traffic going into the new recycling center, and we’re worried about smells and a potential threat to the aquifer. The worse thing, though, is that the new plant represents one more thing for us at Lake Grinnell to worry about.”

But for neighbors, such as the Naisbys, who are worried about dust and other particulates the site would generate, there’s good news: Cofrancesco said the building will feature a high-level air-pollution control system designed to reduce to a barest minimum the amount of dust that leaves the building.

Cofrancesco graduated from Notre Dame in 1999, and earned his degree in law from Pennsylvania State University in 2002. He is father to Jarrod Jr., 18 months old, and he and his wife are expecting a new baby at the end of March.

Grinnell is, in Cofrancesco’s words, “the ultimate family-run business.” Two of his brothers and one aunt and two uncles help run the company.

The family started in the 1970s as a trucking and gravel company, grew to include its paving stone business in 1985, and added the Class B recycling facility in 1995.

With 180 employees, and a weekly payroll that tops $200,000, Grinnell is one of Sparta’s major employers and taxpayers.

Cofrancesco said that between the Class B facility and the paving stone company, Grinnell draws roughly $35 million in revenues each year.

The Grinnell Company sits on 90 acres just off Houses Corner Road. Red longhorn and polled Hereford cattle graze in a meadow to the left of the stone gates, and geese and other waterfowl gather at the still-unfrozen rim of a large pond to the right.

Across the road, on 400 acres the family owns, polled Hereford cows and their calves snack on hay or huddle together warming one another with their breath. A very small calf skates across a frozen puddle on awkward hoofs.

“The Highland Act designated this land as a preservation zone,” Cofrancesco said. “The land is worth about $30,000 an acre. So economically we took quite a hit. But we love this land and we use it for the cattle, and for fishing and hunting.”

The family owns about 40 head of cattle, including three bulls. They also breed quarter horses and own the Homestead Restaurant in Lafayette.

In addition, the family also owns 180 acres near Lake Grinnell that has a high quality of sand and gravel that the Cofrancescos would like to remove, provided the task can be accomplished in an environmentally sound manner.

They hope to have a new proposal to quarry the land before Sparta Township for approval later in the year.

Article from The Sparta Independent - Febuary 18th, 2008 - http://www.strausnews.com/articles/2008/02/16/sparta_independent/news/1.txt

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