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Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Latest News Blog

Three Companies In One; Grinnell Enterprises in Sparta branching out

Category: In The News - By: Seth Augenstein of The New Jersey Herald
Posted by Andrea Ryker on 07/21 at 08:12 AM

SPARTA ‹ One company’s construction debris is another company’s profit margin.

Grinnell Enterprises is made up of three businesses that handle construction waste, and sort it and recycle it into resalable products, including paving stones, topsoil and mulch.

The company claims that 95 percent of what it takes in can be reprocessed and reused. Grinnell also can make claims that few companies can make:

“We can knock a building down on Monday, and then sell the building as mulch (and other products) on Friday without it ever leaving our hands,” said Jarrod Cofrancesco, one of the company’s principals.

The company is looking to make itself into even more of a “soup-to-nuts”
operation. The material recovery facility allowing sorting of nearly every piece of a demolished building was put into operation in November ‹ after 12 years of working toward a permit ‹ and since then, Grinnell has been able to accept increased tonnages of mixed material it can sort and separate into end products.

Concrete can be crushed and re-used into base makings for roads, while wood is chipped into different color and quality mulches, and dirt becomes fertile topsoil. The company has invested heavily in such machinery as its
$2 billion Lubo separator, which separates much of relatively worthless materials into valuable Grinnell products.

One of the mottos of the company is “We have always been green.”

The family-owned company, which has operated its paving stones operation since 1983 and has consistently added to its scope, has only committed further to its “green” focus. Plans to install massive solar panels to power its Houses Corner Road headquarters are only the latest, and most ambitious, of the ideas that have taken hold in the newly-renovated building.

“That’s what makes us unique,” Cofrancesco said. “There’s essentially no waste.”

Another way the company is looking to expand has run up against some opposition. The paving stones it markets along the East Coast require special concrete makings, like sand and aggregates. The cost of those ingredients continues to rise for Grinnell, possibly because most of the sources are controlled by marketplace competitors. The company owns a 160-acre piece of property with deposits of those materials just down the road from its headquarters. But plans to mine the soil on that land have run up against a citizens group from nearby Lake Grinnell, who have fought against the plans locally for more than a year.

“It would give us significantly more staying power here in the county,” said Craig Austin, the president of Grinnell’s stone company.

The company’s application for the soil mining are still ongoing at the township planning board, but in the meantime, Grinnell continues to consolidate its new operations ‹ while still remaining active in the community with fund-raisers and other “giving back activities.” Grinnell employees have rave reviews about the family-owned operation ‹ and in particular, the Cofrancesco family themselves.

“They’re a charitable group of owners, as well as citizens,” Austin said.
“They’re helping everyone.”

Article from NJ Herald 7/6/09

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