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Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Total Recycled Material;Asphalt (ASPH) - 145154 TN

Concrete (CONC) - 315746 TN

Clean Wood (WOOD) - 62782 TN

Brush & Yard Debris (BRSHYD) - 91157 TN

Leaves (LEAF) - N/A TN

Stumps (STMP) - 246735 TN

Latest News Blog

Sparta planning board digs into quarry question

Category: In The News - The New Jersey Herald
Posted by Ralph DeFazio, Sales Manager on 07/01 at 11:42 PM

SPARTA—An application for Grinnell Enterprises to mine roughly 100 acres of soil near Lake Grinnell made a return to the township planning board Wednesday night.

Members of the group Concerned Citizens Against the Quarry, wearing shocking orange shirts, filled the room to capacity, and town officials even broadcast the proceedings out on television screens in the hallways.

But they were not heard Wednesday night, and this is just the beginning of the controversy again.

The application for mining the majority of a 157 acre tract in the northern corner of Sparta is a variation upon Grinnell’s previous application to mine the soil for concrete makings like sand and gravel, but the controversy is identical to the same series of planning board meetings two summers ago. That application—to change the master plan zoning from rural residential to a “planned resource extraction zone”—ended with Grinnell withdrawing their application amid heavy scrutiny and outcry.

With that history in mind, Board Chairman William Hookway read a disclaimer at the outset outlining the process of the zoning change, from possible master plan amendment to potential council ordinance. The chairman also asked the crowd for mutual respect and explained that not everyone, opponents or proponents, would be pleased with the ultimate outcome.

“Whatever the outcome of these hearings, I know this will not be easy,” Hookway said.

Originally, the Wednesday meeting was to be a board-only discussion of how to handle the application. However, Grinnell’s experts, including a planner, the vice president of a railroad and a mining engineer went right into an overview of the project.

Marvin Blethen, a mining engineer, outlined the scope of the actual digging: taking 10.3 million tons of earth out of 117 acres on the property, with a 200-foot buffer outlining the entire 157 acres. The expert said extraction would stay 25 feet above the water table, but would lower the current elevation as much as 69 feet in parts of the woods and fields there. Splitting the 20 years of work into two phases will allow digging, then alternately remediation, of the land.

The public looked on the presentation eagerly, but will have to withhold comment until future meetings. But residents in the area had opinions outside the council chambers.

“It’s another round in the ongoing saga,” said Bob Belknap, a member of the citizens’ group.

“There’s too many things that are being rushed through (recently),” agreed Adrian Delmont. “They cannot push this through.”

However, some critics say they’re not completely against the quarry, just against its scope. There are even supporters of the project along the shore of Lake Grinnell, like Nancy Edsall. Edsall said she has lived in nearby lake communities that have been more affected by overdevelopment of residential property than they have by anything like a “quarry.”

“I have considered myself a concerned citizen—in favor of the quarry,” she said.

Article from The New Jersey Herald - 5/20/09 - http://www.njherald.com/story/news/21GRINNELL-web

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